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Enabling VS Helping a Drug Addict

Enabling VS Helping a Drug Addict

Last updated on October 2nd, 2020 at 05:08 pm

Drug addiction is a major problem in this country and it impacts far more than the addicts. Family members and friends are put in a difficult position as well because they might not know how to get back the person they once loved. But we want to assure you that that person is still in there somewhere and with the right help, they can be found. But HELP is the operative word. If you start to enable this addict you could lose them forever. Keep reading to learn more»

Addiction Statistics

  • In 2013, 23.5 million people were addicted to drugs or alcohol in the United States.

  • Of those 23.5 million people, only ELEVEN percent received addiction treatment.

  • The vast majority of drug addicts are addicted to alcohol– close to 85% in fact.

  • 92% of domestic abusers used some form of drugs or alcohol on the day of their assault.

What is Helping?
The thing that is most difficult for loved ones when it comes to addiction is the factor of emotion. You love the person who is struggling and your natural reaction says to help, but this could be making matters worse. Here are some things you can do to help an addict:

  • Be there to talk when they are ready to be serious about help.

  • Don’t be manipulated.

  • Keep your safety and your families safety above all else.

What is Enabling?
Helping and being there for someone is one thing, but enabling is completely different. Enabling an addict will lead them on the path to rock bottom and that is a place you desperately want to avoid. Here are some signs you might be enabling an addict:

  • They’re economically dependent on you.

  • You provide food in fear that if you don’t nobody will.

  • You sacrifice your own happiness and safety to ‘help’ them.

  • You provide room and board without certain expectations.

Tips to Separate the Two
All of these suggestions are a lot easier said than done, but your overall goal should be to help get this person REAL help. An intervention might be the best way, but you don’t want it to have to get to that point. Being able to distinguish helping and enabling is going to be a great benefit, but it also depends on other factors. Is this person being enabled at work or by friends? If their income is shut off, they will struggle to buy drugs and come to you for help. This is the first sign that things have gotten out of hand.

If you own a business and have concerns about problem employees, our Drug-Free Workplace program can help. Our team of experts at National Drug Screening has the experience to teach your staff what they need to know about weeding out potential dangers.

Call National Drug Screening at 866-843-4545 or visit us on the web to learn more!