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Employee Drug Testing Policies: What You Need To Know

Posted: February 4, 2019

A lot of people view employee drug testing as an invasion of one's privacy. They feel that what workers do on their own time is their own business. Well, this statement is true, but often, substance abuse carries over into the workplace, which means it becomes the employer's problem. Why? There are a substantial number of reasons why drug use at work is an issue. Trying to name them all here would likely take up the entire page. So, instead, we will stick to the more common concerns such as...

  • Theft
  • Absenteeism
  • Legal Liabilities
  • Lost Productivity
  • Injuries, Fatalities, And More

So, as anyone can clearly see, it is of the utmost importance for employers to adopt zero-tolerance policies and create safe environments. It doesn't matter if the place is a fast-food establishment, a law firm, a factory, or something else, employees deserve to have the peace of mind in knowing that their co-workers are clean and sober. Interested parties should read further to learn more about employee drug testing.

Three Ways To Conduct Workplace Drug Testing

One reason why company owners don't like employee drug testing is that they feel as if it will disrupt the organization's day to day operations. After all, time is money and bottom lines are crucial in the modern world. However, the tests administered today are not the ones from years past. There is minimal workflow disruption, so there has never been a better time than now to implement a plan for a drug-free office.

Bosses currently have three options to choose from for their drug testing needs. First, there is the traditional urine sample method. Most people are familiar with the technique as it is regularly used at doctors offices and hospitals to check for various ailments. Hence, it only takes a few minutes, and then, they are able to get on with the rest of their day.

Collecting hair samples is another possibility. To complete this testing, 100 to 120 1.5" strands are needed. They can come from the person's head or body. This procedure is able to detect drug use from as far back as 90-days. Not everybody is keen on hair follicle testing though. Don't fret if your employees have a problem with this method. There is still another option to discuss.

Saliva or oral fluid testing is becoming more popular these days. Specimens are collected and sent to a laboratory for initial screenings and confirmation testings. This method is an ideal solution for detecting recent drug use. However, it does not identify long-term exposure as drugs are only discoverable in saliva for about 3-days.